Friday, May 9, 2014

Thomas Blood and the Crown Jewels of England

Thomas Blood
(1618 – 1680)
On May 9, 1671, Anglo-Irish officer and desperado Colonel Thomas Blood attempted to steal the Crown Jewels of England from the Tower of London.

Not much is known about Thomas Blood's early life. It is assumed that he was born to a successful blacksmith in Ireland. His father owned some land across the country and his grandfather was a member of the Parliament. Historians believe, that he went to England with the outbreak of the Civil War in 1642 and initially took up arms with the Royalist forces loyal to Charles I. However, as the conflicts went on, he switched sides, becoming a lieutenant in Oliver Cromwell's Roundheads. When King Charles II was restored to the Crowns of the Three Kingdoms in 1660, Blood fled back to Ireland along with his entire family. However, he faced bad times considering his financial situation and attempted to cause insurrection along with his fellows in misery.

Blood began to seek action and suggested to storm Dublin Castle, and kidnap the 1st Duke of Ormonde and Lord Lieutenant of Ireland for ransom. However, the plot was foiled and Blood escaped to the United Dutch Provinces, even though several of his collaborators were caught and executed. During his time in the Dutch Republic, Thomas Blood became got to know the 2nd Duke of Buckingham, wealthy George Villiers. Historians now believe that the Duke who used Blood in order to punish his own political and social adversaries. Blood returned to England soon even though he was still a wanted man. He changed his name and it is believed that he started working as a doctor. By this time, he came to realize that Ormonde had taken up residence at Clarendon House. On the night of 6 December 1670, Blood and his accomplices attacked Ormonde. He was dragged from his coach, and taken on horseback along Piccadilly with the intention of hanging him at Tyburn. A paper was pinned to his chest explaining reasons for his capture and execution. However, Ormonde managed to free himself and ran away. Thomas Blood was not suspected of the crime, even though a reward was offered for the capture of the attempted assassins.

Not even one year later, Blood began to plan his next coup - the theft of the Crown Jewels. He visited the Tower of London dressed as a parson and accompanied by a woman who pretended to be his wife, willing to see the Crown Jewels. When they arrived, the woman feigned a stomach complaint and was taken care of by Master of the Jewel House, 77-year-old Talbot Edwards and his wife. A few days later, the thief returned to Edwards and became friends with his family, gaining their trust. He managed to convince Edwards to show the jewels to him and Blood attacked him in order to take off with the jewelry. Soon, the alarm was raised, but until this day, it is not completely known how this happened. It is assumed that Edwards' son, Wythe shouted, "Treason! Murder! The crown is stolen!". Blood and his gang fled but he was captured before reaching the Iron Gate. The crown was found but a few stones were missing. Blood then refused to answer to anyone, but the king and as a result he was not only pardoned but also given land in Ireland. The reasons for this decision remain unknown until this day.

Thomas Blood passed away on 24 August, 1680.

At yovisto, you may be interested in a video documentary on the attempted theft of the Crown Jewels by Thomas Blood.



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